Lessons Learnt from McDonald’s Social Media Disaster

The following post was originally published in eMarketing Wall

McDonald's

McDonald's

When you are a company whose products are synonymous with fast food and poor nutrition and whose job posts have made it into the Oxford English Dictionary as a byword for “An unstimulating, low-paid job with few prospects, esp. one created by the expansion of the service sector,” you might, understandably, want to use social media to get a different message across.

 
This is exactly what McDonald’s did when it decided to pour some cash into Twitter and buy some Twitter hashtags to promote its use of fresh produce, inserting paid-for tweets into the streams of Twitter users with the hashtag #MeetTheFarmers.
The campaign was intended to last 24-hours and it was well-intentioned enough and, initially, at least, appeared to work. When McDonald’s however changed the hashtag to #McDStories things went south very quickly. The hashtag was hijacked by angry customers who posted Tweets like: Continue reading

Be Bold and Reflective in Using Social Media

Stacey Ramirez, Program Officer, E-Mediat shares her insights from the Social Media Conference for Non-Profits Conference held in San Francisco in November 2011.

 


The excitement was palpable during the Social Media for Nonprofits conference that took place last month in San Francisco. The crowd was gearing up to hear from social media icons, such as Beth Kanter, author of the Networked Nonprofit, Craig Newmark of Craigslist, and speakers from LinkedIn and Kiva.org. Perhaps even more thrilling was to see a very packed conference room teeming with people of all ages representing Bay Area non-profits. Then came the Social Media Revolution 2011 Video. It mesmerized us with its cutting-edge look and rhythmic beat, as it ticked off a number of striking facts: over 50% the world’s population is under 30; if Wikipedia were a book, it would be 2.25 million pages and if Facebook were a country, it would be the 3rd largest in the world. Continue reading